The Village - A winter book list for children

Helping to raise parents with our own blend of parenting stories, advice and cool finds.
The village: helping raise parents with our own blend of parenting stories, advice, hacks and cool finds
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LEARN

A winter book list for children

By Krista Lii

During the winter months, our morning nature walks are usually snow-filled and bitterly cold. There’s a certain stillness outside, a silence that blankets the earth only in winter. There’s nothing quite like a brisk walk in a snow-covered forest, breathing in that sharp fresh air and then returning indoors to peel off all the layers. Winter has a special place in my heart; it certainly has a knack for drawing us closer to one another.

...And what better way to spend time together, than to cuddle under a blanket by the fire and read some books! We love seasonal reads at our house. There is something so magical about reading a book, and then stepping out into nature and seeing it all around us. Years ago, I decided to start a seasonal shelf in our home; a spot where we rotate the books as the seasons change. My kids and I have gathered our favourite winter stories, and we’re sharing them with you below!

A Children’s Seasonal Bookshelf

The Mitten by Jan Brett

Possibly my favourite winter book. I remember reading this book back when I was a child and being captivated by the story of so many animals fitting into a small mitten. Since having children, I was reintroduced to it and was happy to discover that the magic of it hasn’t faded one bit. It is a truly enchanting read.

Over and Under the Snow by Kate Messner

I just love this author! We had a few of her nature-themed books already, so I was very excited to find out she wrote one about the subnivean zone. My kids and I had recently watched an episode of BBC Earth’s ‘The Hunt’, and we learned all about the subnivean zone together. They were so excited to read this book, and then to spot an illustration of a sly fox hunting a mouse under the snow, quite similar to what we had seen in the documentary. I especially love the author’s note at the end of the book which contains more facts about the animals featured in the book, as well as the subnivean zone.

Owl Moon by Jane Yolen

A book for the bird lover. It’s a quiet, peaceful adventure shared between a father and his child as they go for an evening walk in the wintery woods to watch for owls. The illustrations are gorgeous, and will surely make you want to go ‘owling’ in the forest this winter!

The Shortest Day by Wendy Pfeffer

The perfect book to read around winter solstice. It’s a very informative book with lots of facts about the shortest day of the year, and winter solstice practices from all around the world.

Goodbye Autumn, Hello Winter by Kenard Pak

This is a simple story about the changing of the seasons. Cute illustrations that slowly progress from fall to winter.

LEARN

A winter book list for children

By Krista Lii

During the winter months, our morning nature walks are usually snow-filled and bitterly cold. There’s a certain stillness outside, a silence that blankets the earth only in winter. There’s nothing quite like a brisk walk in a snow-covered forest, breathing in that sharp fresh air and then returning indoors to peel off all the layers. Winter has a special place in my heart; it certainly has a knack for drawing us closer to one another.

...And what better way to spend time together, than to cuddle under a blanket by the fire and read some books! We love seasonal reads at our house. There is something so magical about reading a book, and then stepping out into nature and seeing it all around us. Years ago, I decided to start a seasonal shelf in our home; a spot where we rotate the books as the seasons change. My kids and I have gathered our favourite winter stories, and we’re sharing them with you below!

A Children’s Seasonal Bookshelf

The Mitten by Jan Brett

Possibly my favourite winter book. I remember reading this book back when I was a child and being captivated by the story of so many animals fitting into a small mitten. Since having children, I was reintroduced to it and was happy to discover that the magic of it hasn’t faded one bit. It is a truly enchanting read.

Over and Under the Snow by Kate Messner

I just love this author! We had a few of her nature-themed books already, so I was very excited to find out she wrote one about the subnivean zone. My kids and I had recently watched an episode of BBC Earth’s ‘The Hunt’, and we learned all about the subnivean zone together. They were so excited to read this book, and then to spot an illustration of a sly fox hunting a mouse under the snow, quite similar to what we had seen in the documentary. I especially love the author’s note at the end of the book which contains more facts about the animals featured in the book, as well as the subnivean zone.

Owl Moon by Jane Yolen

A book for the bird lover. It’s a quiet, peaceful adventure shared between a father and his child as they go for an evening walk in the wintery woods to watch for owls. The illustrations are gorgeous, and will surely make you want to go ‘owling’ in the forest this winter!

The Shortest Day by Wendy Pfeffer

The perfect book to read around winter solstice. It’s a very informative book with lots of facts about the shortest day of the year, and winter solstice practices from all around the world.

Goodbye Autumn, Hello Winter by Kenard Pak

This is a simple story about the changing of the seasons. Cute illustrations that slowly progress from fall to winter.


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Night Tree by Eve Bunting

We made treats for the birds the other day, and I couldn’t believe how perfectly this book went with our activity! It tells the story of a family’s tradition of decorating a special tree for the birds every year at Christmastime. My children and I were mesmerized by the detailed illustrations. I took an extra few seconds at the end of every page just to stare at them!

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

This book belongs on everyone’s shelf. It’s a winter classic! The story tells of a boy who heads outside for a fun, snow-filled day. Happy and light!

Winter by Gerda Muller

This is a lovely picture book without words. My kids like taking turns telling the story that they imagine is happening in each illustration. Every picture is worth a thousand words.

The Tomten by Astrid Lindgren

We bought this charming storybook for my daughter’s birthday one year. The Tomten is a little troll who visits the farm animals on winter nights to make sure they are warm and comfortable. It’s a very calm and quiet read, perfect as a bedtime story.

Snowflake Bentley by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Based on a true story about the first known snowflake photographer, Wilson Bentley! This one came recommended to me on Instagram. As a photographer myself, I knew I had to give it a read. I think it would be fun to incorporate this story as part of a winter snow study for children.

In the Snow by Sharon Phillips Denslow

A sweet and simple story. Read it before you put out the birdseed and suet. It will warm your heart. I’m sad I haven’t been able to find this book at any of our local libraries. I hope you have better luck!

I hope you cozy up with a blanket, and enjoy these very special stories! What are your favourite children’s winter books? Are there any great stories that we’re missing on our seasonal shelf?

About the Author: Krista Lii is a homeschooling, nature-loving mother of four living in Ontario, Canada. She’s also a professional photographer with an emphasis on outdoor lifestyle. She loves exploring the local forests with her children, and she is passionate about getting out into nature every day, no matter the weather. Her family adventures are shared on Instagram. She writes a blog about her homeschooling and nature exploration, which you can read over at www.ourwildness.com.

Night Tree by Eve Bunting

We made treats for the birds the other day, and I couldn’t believe how perfectly this book went with our activity! It tells the story of a family’s tradition of decorating a special tree for the birds every year at Christmastime. My children and I were mesmerized by the detailed illustrations. I took an extra few seconds at the end of every page just to stare at them!

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

This book belongs on everyone’s shelf. It’s a winter classic! The story tells of a boy who heads outside for a fun, snow-filled day. Happy and light!

Winter by Gerda Muller

This is a lovely picture book without words. My kids like taking turns telling the story that they imagine is happening in each illustration. Every picture is worth a thousand words.

The Tomten by Astrid Lindgren

We bought this charming storybook for my daughter’s birthday one year. The Tomten is a little troll who visits the farm animals on winter nights to make sure they are warm and comfortable. It’s a very calm and quiet read, perfect as a bedtime story.

Snowflake Bentley by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Based on a true story about the first known snowflake photographer, Wilson Bentley! This one came recommended to me on Instagram. As a photographer myself, I knew I had to give it a read. I think it would be fun to incorporate this story as part of a winter snow study for children.

In the Snow by Sharon Phillips Denslow

A sweet and simple story. Read it before you put out the birdseed and suet. It will warm your heart. I’m sad I haven’t been able to find this book at any of our local libraries. I hope you have better luck!

I hope you cozy up with a blanket, and enjoy these very special stories! What are your favourite children’s winter books? Are there any great stories that we’re missing on our seasonal shelf?

About the Author: Krista Lii is a homeschooling, nature-loving mother of four living in Ontario, Canada. She’s also a professional photographer with an emphasis on outdoor lifestyle. She loves exploring the local forests with her children, and she is passionate about getting out into nature every day, no matter the weather. Her family adventures are shared on Instagram. She writes a blog about her homeschooling and nature exploration, which you can read over at www.ourwildness.com.

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